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lustik:

Alice Dufeu

Lustiktwitter | pinterest | etsy

typethatilike:

Monier

bleed.com

visualgraphc:

Dark Summer by Cosmic Nuggets

arrangealign:

Design by Bob Ewing

snowce:

John Frederick Kensett, Twilight in the Cedars at Darien, Connecticut, 1872

(Source: painting-archives)

snowce:

John Frederick Kensett, Twilight in the Cedars at Darien, Connecticut, 1872

visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk

marykatemcdevittblog:

Continuing this series of sweet treat dude illustrations (ice cream and popsicle) I’ve been making, I decided to embrace the heat this time with a little s’more guy and little fire buddy to the tune of Whitney Houston.

marykatemcdevittblog:

Continuing this series of sweet treat dude illustrations (ice cream and popsicle) I’ve been making, I decided to embrace the heat this time with a little s’more guy and little fire buddy to the tune of Whitney Houston.

odditiesoflife:

Incredible Miniature Animals Carved on Pencil Tips

Loving everything tiny, Seattle based artist Diem Chau has created her most recent project. Miniature animals carved in the wood and graphite of carpenter pencils. Carefully shaving the wood from the pencil to expose the inner graphite, she pain-painstakingly carved miniature animals with amazing results.

source

(Source: isobelarnberg)

visualgraphc:

Collage-Drawings by Bene Rohlmann

visualgraphc:

Black’n’White II by Ooli Mos

betype:

On Reglan Road by Steve Simpson.

fuck-zines:

Marion Balac

Random zines and drawings from:

http://www.marionbalac.com/

http://www.marionbalac.com/

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supersonicart:

Paintings by Joe Vaux.

Joe Vaux’s hellish depictions of Tim Burton-esque worlds delight with their hidden humors and playful landscapes.  See more below!

Read More

beautifultype:

Philosophy, Art & Science ambigram by John Langdon.

Ambigrams are words that can be read equally well from more than one point of view. Most of John Langdon’s ambigrams read the same when turned upside down, or rotated 180 degrees.

More on his website http://www.johnlangdon.net/